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Psychological Resilience as a Predictor of Symptom Severity in Adolescents With Poor Recovery Following Concussion. J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 2019

Psychological Resilience as a Predictor of Symptom Severity in Adolescents With Poor Recovery Following Concussion.

Durish CL, Yeates KO, Brooks BL. J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 2019. Apr;25(4):346-354.

https://doi.org/10.1017/S1355617718001169

Abstract

Objectives: Examine the mediating effects of anxiety and depressive symptoms on the relationship between psychological resilience and post-concussive symptoms (PCS) in children with poor recovery following concussion.

Participants and Methods: Adolescents (N=93), ages 13 to 18 years, were assessed at a neuropsychology screening clinic at a children’s hospital. They sustained concussions more than 1 month before the clinic visit (median time since injury=5.1 months; range=42–473 days) and were seen on the basis of poor recovery (i.e., presence of persistent PCS and complaints of cognitive problems). Self-reported psychological resilience was measured using the 10-item version of the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale; self- and parent-reported anxiety and depressive symptoms were measured using the Behaviour Assessment System for Children – Second Edition; and self- and parent-reported PCS were measured using the Post-Concussion Symptom Inventory. All variables were measured concurrently. Regression-based mediation analyses were conducted to examine anxiety and depressive symptoms as mediators of the relationship between psychological resilience and PCS.

Results: Psychological resilience significantly predicted self-reported PCS. Self-reported anxiety and depressive symptoms significantly mediated the relationship between resilience and self-reported PCS, and parent-reported child depressive symptoms significantly mediated the relationship between resilience and self- and parent-reported PCS.

Conclusions: Psychological resilience plays an important role in recovery from concussion, and this relationship may be mediated by anxiety and depressive symptoms. These results help shed light on the mechanisms of the role of psychological resilience in predicting PCS in children with prolonged symptom recovery.